“These subtle changes of mood prove the true maestro.”
Radio Klassik

Press



Alain Steffen Pizzicato (SuperSonic Award) July 17 2017

“Considering Beethoven, Schnabel, Gulda, Brendel ... Kempff, Gilels and Lewis, they each convey Beethoven to us in his true grandeur. Yet, we must inevitably place Ingrid Marsoner´s interpretation of this three Sonatas Op. 78, 101 & 111 on the same level ... The performances are musicality and musicianship at the same time, technically outstanding and always at the pulse of the music, thrilling and lyrical, narrative and virtuoso. And yet so wonderfully natural and ingenuous! ... A veritable ray of hope!”


Patrick Rucker Gramophone July 2017

“It may be in the craggy, windswept heights of Op 111 that Marsoner is most impressive ... Here, Marsoner’s ability to suggest the mighty integrity of Beethoven’s architecture from multiple points of view within the musical narrative is particularly impressive. This is mature Beethoven which will be understandable by virtually anyone, even as it remains engagingly personal in expression. Without awe, Marsoner expresses her reverence for Beethoven with scrupulous attention to detail. This well-recorded disc will be a welcome addition to any library of Beethoven piano music.” Read more


Rainer E. Janka Klassik Heute July 2017

“Ingrid Marsoner’s interpretation of Sonata Op. 78 is fluent and nuanced, genuine and devoted, sensitive and inspired, with rhapsodic tension and conviction. She extracts many a design secret from this wonderful F# major Sphinx.”


Rainer Aschemeier Naxos Newsletter June 2017

“Today we can look back with luxury on recordings played by maestri such as Fischer, Solomon, Gilels ... With Ingrid Marsoner from Austria, a pianist has appeared who has, at the very least, genuinely surprised and excited me. In her performance you find the same depth that those great pianists mentioned above achieved. And because of her very personal approach to these works, at the same time Marsoner brings Beethoven into our epoch ... Without needlessly and misguidedly, Marsoner gives us a convincing interpretation for the 21st century.”


Ingrid Heydecke-Seidel Hohenloher Zeitung June 21 2017

“Fascinating Fantasies from Baroque to Romantic.   Agile und with stylistic confidence she introduced the stirring music and its sprawling chromatics, modulations and spirited harmonies, aired the expressive recitative and shaped the harmonically refined fugue with mastery … she expressed this world of emotions with her inspired performance and her wonderful touch.”


OEBZ October 28 2016

“Ingrid Marsoner impressed with her sensitive art of touch and with her brilliance.”


Christof Jetzschke Klassik Heute April 9 2015

“The performer entirely disappears behind the music and is the medium through which Mozart himself seems to be speaking in complete clarity. Despite this withdrawal, Marsoner’s view of Mozart bears the stamp of what is unmistakably personal. Profound musical insight and an extraordinary understanding of Mozart speak from the pianist’s brilliant art ... Conclusion: this is a Mozart that will resound for a long, very long time.”


Arndt Cobbe Klassik Newsletter Berlin April 9 2015

“There are thousands of Mozart piano recordings, but we always take delight in a CD by the Austrian Ingrid Marsoner. Not only does the Graz-born pianist play wonderfully subtly and sensitively, she has also compiled an attractive programme.”


Ursula Strohal Tiroler Tageszeitung February 15 2015

“Delicate, clever and with a moving differentiation between the dark work KV 457 together with the Fantasia and the light Sonata KV 331.”


Radio Stephansdom February 4 2015

“A master of playing nuances and shadows.”


Uschi Loigge Kleine Zeitung July 15 2013

“Ingenious interaction between two exceptionally skilled artists ... Sensitively, the pianist initially lent Beethoven’s bagatelles to Brandauer’s recitation. When she then made Beethoven’s Piano Sonata No. 32 whirl through the church interior, not only Brandauer turned into a spellbound listener ... It was an exceptional evening.”


Manfred Posch Kärntner Tageszeitung July 15 2013

“Interpreted by a blossoming star of the international music scene, Ingrid Marsoner, whose artistic home has long been the most prominent music halls in the world. She regularly cooperates with Klaus Maria Brandauer, who has just turned 70. Not only will we hear a lot more from this musician — we must.”


Pizzicato Luxembourg May 2013

“And the pianist Ingrid Marsoner also gets bitten by the bug. She publicly declares herself to be a fan of LaSalle and turns the music into veritable little pearls with thrilling interpretations. Technically, the pianist is simply brilliant.”


Christof Jetzschke Klassik Heute February 27 2013

“This is illustrated by Ingrid Marsoner’s crystal clearly articulating, strikingly brilliant and present, distinctive, devoted and whimsical performance. It sparkles and shines incessantly.”


Emden Magazine August 14 2012

“Ingrid Marsoner played the powerful work with the 30 variations perfectly and by heart, a great intellectual achievement. And although that alone was occasion for unrestricted admiration, the nature and sovereignty of her performance was also astonishing, making such an impression that, once the last note had faded away, a silence descended that nobody ventured to interrupt.” (About a live performance of Bach`s Goldberg Variations)


Anja Reczikowski PianoNews May/June 2012

“Even often heard classics can be a surprise when they are so wonderfully played as by the Austrian pianist Ingrid Marsoner.”


Attila Csampai Crescendo Magazine May 2012

“Her inspired, crisply fresh and breathing rendition of the C major concerto by Beethoven is fascinating. Its dialogue culture, its distribution of stress and its tense tempi are reminiscent of Glenn Gould’s legendary performance of 1958. Here, living individuals act on a fictional stage. Here, you sense and witness the wit and intellectual prowess of the young Beethoven. Here, we encounter the spirit of the age and utopia. Traditional sounds are still capable of arousing us.”


Walter Schoenenberger Codex flores (CH) June 28 2012

“Ingrid Marsoner masters all the technical and musical demands of this rarity with substantial ‘jeu perlé’, transparent technique, clearly arranged articulation, polished transitions, vital noblesse in expression and a contagious delight in playing ... In her compatriot Thomas Rösner, and the Biel Symphony Orchestra, she has partners who support her intentions with commitment and energy.”


Peter Blaha BUEHNE March 2012

“Ingrid Marsoner has long proven that she is equally at home in Schubert’s realm of nuances and in Bach’s world of polyphony. On her most recent CD, she now presents her virtuoso side on the piano, and this is a magnificent success in the case of Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Hummel’s Piano Concerto No. 2 ... With all her delight in ebullient virtuosity, in this music, too, she places faith in her feeling for the lyrical features, which radiate through her great mastery.”


Christof Jetzschke Klassik Heute April 3 2012

“In just as inspired and enormously crisp a manner, Ingrid Marsoner and Thomas Rösner tackle the powerful and contemplative and the dramatic and soothing passages ... Everything is in permanent flux, vibrates, glitters and diffuses with great warmth... It is striking with what respect the interpreters place themselves into the service of each work. They show no interest in extravagance or in an individual note achieved at any price. They interact as equal partners, breathe together and demonstrate an excellent grasp for the element of dialogue, producing a constantly stimulating discourse. Just how seriously Marsoner takes eloquence is also shown by the many chains of trills and by the preponderance of virtuoso passages in both concertos. Here, too, the pianist seems to be concerned with the greatest possible and subtlest expression. She merits the highest praise!”


Dr. Eckhardt van den Hoogen Pro Classics February 2012

“With her Schubert production and ‘her’ Goldberg Variations, Ingrid Marsoner has miraculously demonstrated a highly sensitive set of antennae, which she has now with no less astonishing assurance directed at the two musical parabolic mirrors, in order to wed Beethoven’s immense energy — just listen to the minor of the finale — and Hummel’s elegance — Mozart’s KV 467 is not far away in the larghetto — one enhancing the other. This very aspect seems to be her special gift: a feeling for the nuances that reciprocally elevate the composition behind the contrasts. This is, for instance, the reason why an established composer such as Beat Furrer (“Ingrid Marsoner is a wonderful pianist”) is just as impressed as his three-years-older ‘colleague’ Rick LaSalle, who, after hearing Marsoner play his Ragtime and Zorzico from the Eighth Piano Sonata, was speechless except for the words: “It could not be better or more correct.”


Jochen Schmoldt Plaerrer August 8, 2010

“What the young Austrian pianist, Ingrid Marsoner, achieves is absolutely stunning. Her playing is not only completely precise and transparent, but also has immense clarity, and generates a powerful brilliance and emotionality that is on par with Gould in a parallel universe. Breath-taking and beautiful.”


Radio Stephansdom February 2 2012

“Directly comparing and contrasting Hummel and Beethoven is a highly appealing idea. Ingrid Marsoner is a wonderful pianist!”


Maila von Haussen Radio Stephansdom February 2 2012

“Her technical skills are impressive, and the most impressive feature is the way Marsoner treats the transitions. Ingrid Marsoner plays Johann Nepomuk Hummel’s pronounced rhythms vigorously and energetically and then moves, almost indiscernibly, to lyrical passages. These subtle changes of mood prove the true maestro.”


Scott Noriega Fanfare Magazine (USA) March/April 2011

“There is hardly a note that is not as clear as day...Her flowing and mellifluous performance of the figuration in (Goldberg)variation 13 creates one of the most beautiful renditions of the piece that I’ve come across...if you like Bach sprightly and fun, this is your pianist.”


Peter Blaha BUEHNE June 2010

“Only a person with a truly ardent affinity with Bach can play the Goldberg Variations as straightforwardly, as unpretentiously, and in such a wonderfully direct, lucid manner as Ingrid Marsoner. That this is what constitutes great art is no secret. Technical sovereignty and musical intelligence are, of course, its prerequisites... As a master, she guides the listener through the 30 variations of the opening aria, and the wealth of Bach’s compositional skill is revealed in all its clarity.”


Ursula Strohal Tiroler Tageszeitung August 10 2010

“After a widely acclaimed CD with Schubert Sonatas, the Viennese label Gramola is now publishing Ingrid Marsoner's perspective on Bach's 'Goldberg Variations', and it is spectacular due to its clarity, precision, and its poetic energy.”


Charles Timbrell Fanfare Magazine November/Dezember 2009

“There are many justly famous recordings of it (Schubert’s Sonata a-Minor, D 664) including those of Myra Hess and Svjatoslav Richter, but Marsoner holds her own well, even in that company ... It’s an auspicious recording debut, and the sound is as natural and refined as the playing.”


FAKTY I KOMENTARIY Kiev January 27 2008

“The highlight of the evening was the performance of the Austrian pianist Ingrid Marsoner... The orchestra began to play Mozart’s Piano Concerto KV 488 in an exceptional way, which was soft, very tender and melancholy, with every phrase rounded off. When Ingrid Marsoner began to play, it was clear that the orchestra was following her phrasing. She performed with great brilliance and in her interpretation, Mozart never sounded hard, but always fluid, harmonious and feminine — the pianist’s personality shone through.”


Peter Blaha BUEHNE June 2008

“Ingrid Marsoner is a sensitive pianist. When she strikes a chord one has the feeling that she causes something to vibrate beyond the particular harmony, something for which this chord was merely a catalyst. And when she shapes a theme, tension rings from her playing because she confides in the theme without wanting to anticipate the answer to the question which finally emerges. These qualities predestine her to be an ideal Schubert interpreter.”